Museums of Now or Then?

Children playing under giant silk flag at Maidan

Children playing under giant silk flag at Maidan

I was recently asked by Kraina magazine to share some thoughts in response to the idea of a ‘Museum of Maidan’; and last weekend I took a marshrutka to Pereyaslav Khmelnitskyi, the “city of museums” which boasts at least 27 different museums.

Sign for the Museum of Bread

Sign for the Museum of Bread

I only managed to see the Museum of Bread and the Museum of Rushnyk, both contained within the outdoor Museum of Folk Architecture and Folklife, a picturesque location to which various historic buildings were relocated when the Dnieper river dams were built and several villlages were submerged.

Entrance to Rushnyk Museum

Entrance to Rushnyk Museum

The open air museum, and the various small museums within, were maintained with care and with a real attention to detail within displays. So there were fresh rushes on the floors and dried flowers were chosen to match the rushnyk (embroidered cloths) hung on the walls.

To western European visitors, the museums might seem old fashioned – no interactive flashy displays, no high tech gadgets to persuade hyperactive children that learning is FUN; just well-used historical objects placed in cases, or displayed within very old buildings, supervised by even older women. But I found these museums to be totally engaging – purposeful, with a singular sense of identity; intimate and small enough not to feel overwhelmed; and loved.

It made me think about how to ensure museums are places of passion as well as curiosity; of fierce learning and a sense of connection to what’s gone before; arousing the same passions in the viewer as in the collector, and thus defended for the future?

an informal Museum of Maidan is already happening in the square

an informal Museum of Maidan is already happening in the square

“Like Ukraine now, any ‘Museum of Maidan’ needs to face forward whilst respecting the past.  As well as preserving heritage, we need to make space for new conversations in and about the public realm, and for new traditions. How can we use the ‘Museum of Maidan’ to encourage people in Ukraine to participate in, and thus redefine, culture as something that speaks to us about life now?   A Museum of Now, as well as a Museum of Then.

I was particularly impressed by the spirit of creativity maintained throughout the adversity of the Maidan revolution…how people managed to subvert state power and the armed police by making small acts of individual protest that were a creative response to the dominant narrative of showing strength through combat: the piano-playing men and women on the frontline, whose fingers kept playing in temperatures below minus 20; the painted helmets bringing the tradition of ‘petrykivka’ to the protesters’ orange hardhats; the women holding mirrors up to the ranks of policemen, inviting them to look closely at who they were.

Window for blogI propose that the Museum of Maidan is not a place but a series of Acts of Creative Protest that celebrate the collective spirit of Maidan. Rather than a building, full of objects, could there be an annual call out for ideas which results in actions? Ideas shortlisted and winners agreed by a committee of experts who allocate resources to each year’s Maidan Museum of Now?  These small gestures of protest would honour the past by staying relevant to the present, responding to the specifics of new times and new places.

Tributes of candles and flowers brought daily

Tributes of candles and flowers brought daily

Another idea would be to make the Museum an event which involves both a temporary display of objects in public, and a shared civic curatorial responsibility.  People would be invited to bring an object of their choice – something which symbolises the spirit of Maidan to them – which would be displayed in Maidan Nezhalezhnosti for one day only. It might be something they made, or a photo, or a newspaper cutting. On that day, others might contribute by doing something in public like singing a song, reading out a poem, playing a tune for those that attend.

The final action would involve people leaving the square,  each person taking a single object away with them and looking after it at home until the following year… when the Museum opens again, for one day only.  The Museum is then both public, for a very short time, and also private, back in your home, with one object in your care…so the people are the curators, and the custodians of the Museum,and the event serves to remind us that we are responsible for looking after our society as carefully as we do our own homes and family.

Rushnyk on display inside a traditional cottage

Rushnyk on display inside a traditional cottage

Just as the work to create a better society in Ukraine carries on, and isn’t over just because a corrupt President has gone and there’s a new Parliament, so the struggle to create a better world continues beyond this country’s borders as well as inside. I would like any Museum of Maidan to connect with people engaged in peaceful struggle elsewhere: in Thailand or Turkey, Venezuela and Egypt. So could the Museum be something very small that contains fire or light which moves around the world –  kept alight by the care of those who are in the frontline, as a way of reminding us all that we do better if we think about others before ourselves?”

(This text was published in Kraina magazine, 20/04/14; a current affairs magazine published weekly in Ukraine)

 

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