Odessa…a reason to return to Ukraine

poster - superukraineWhen I left Ukraine in April, I found it hard to say goodbye to new friends and colleagues so I made it easier for myself by stating that I wasn’t actually saying goodbye [forever?] because I would be coming back.

And now I’m packing a suitcase and checking the weather forecast. [I know it’s only the British who feel the need to pack clothes for every season when we go on holiday, but that’s because the average holiday week in July in the UK can contain wind, torrential rain, sunburn, relentless drizzle and fog, often in the space of a single day].

I’ll be visiting the Odessa International Film Festival this weekend, after stopping over in Kyiv to see friends, and to see what the capital city looks like in summer, rather than winter.

Stephen Frears will be in Odessa as one of the featured film makers at the 2014 Film Festival; and Hitchcock’s Blackmail will also form part of the Opening weekend, screened to an audience of thousands sitting on the Potemkin Steps. This year’s Film Festival is taking place, despite huge obstacles and with few resources, thanks to the dedication and hard work of people like Producer, Julia Sinkevych, and her team – she writes ” It is challenging this year, and probably the most difficult project in my career and in careers of my colleagues due to the situation in Ukraine”.

Poster comment after Russia annexed Crimea, displayed in Kyiv (April 2014)

Poster comment after Russia annexed Crimea, displayed in Kyiv (April 2014)

Ukraine is still in the news here in Britain but weekly, not daily. And the situation is still tense, especially in the eastern regions: a month ago, Izolyatsia – a vibrant platform for contemporary culture in Donetsk [see previous posts] was taken over by pro-Russian separatists; and my friend Olga wrote, after another murder in the centre of Donetsk ” It’s awful, and the most terrible thing is that we are kind of getting used to gun shootings and deaths of ordinary people.”

But she ended her email “Anyway, life is going on and kids are going on dancing, singing and doing a lot of interesting things. Besides, it is our common history which should be kept through generations.”

People’s resilience in the face of conflict is remarkable; and Olga’s positive statement, and the determination of the Odessa Film Festival team to go ahead with this year’s festival, is testament to that.

On a more mundane note, I’m looking forward to sitting on those Potemkin Steps (made famous thanks to Eisenstein’s 1925 film, The Battleship Potemkin)  by the shores of the Black Sea, in Ukraine’s third largest city, which was officially founded by Catherine The Great in 1794. By 1824, Pushkin was writing of Odessa that “its air was full of all Europe”, in reference to its extremely diverse population.

I’m also looking forward to taking a battered yellow marshrutka around town, eating a bowl of borscht, getting a receipt in a little box, seeing Napolean cake on every menu, and seeing friends and colleagues at the British Council in Kyiv, and in Odessa…

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Museums of Now or Then?

Children playing under giant silk flag at Maidan

Children playing under giant silk flag at Maidan

I was recently asked by Kraina magazine to share some thoughts in response to the idea of a ‘Museum of Maidan’; and last weekend I took a marshrutka to Pereyaslav Khmelnitskyi, the “city of museums” which boasts at least 27 different museums.

Sign for the Museum of Bread

Sign for the Museum of Bread

I only managed to see the Museum of Bread and the Museum of Rushnyk, both contained within the outdoor Museum of Folk Architecture and Folklife, a picturesque location to which various historic buildings were relocated when the Dnieper river dams were built and several villlages were submerged.

Entrance to Rushnyk Museum

Entrance to Rushnyk Museum

The open air museum, and the various small museums within, were maintained with care and with a real attention to detail within displays. So there were fresh rushes on the floors and dried flowers were chosen to match the rushnyk (embroidered cloths) hung on the walls.

To western European visitors, the museums might seem old fashioned – no interactive flashy displays, no high tech gadgets to persuade hyperactive children that learning is FUN; just well-used historical objects placed in cases, or displayed within very old buildings, supervised by even older women. But I found these museums to be totally engaging – purposeful, with a singular sense of identity; intimate and small enough not to feel overwhelmed; and loved.

It made me think about how to ensure museums are places of passion as well as curiosity; of fierce learning and a sense of connection to what’s gone before; arousing the same passions in the viewer as in the collector, and thus defended for the future?

an informal Museum of Maidan is already happening in the square

an informal Museum of Maidan is already happening in the square

“Like Ukraine now, any ‘Museum of Maidan’ needs to face forward whilst respecting the past.  As well as preserving heritage, we need to make space for new conversations in and about the public realm, and for new traditions. How can we use the ‘Museum of Maidan’ to encourage people in Ukraine to participate in, and thus redefine, culture as something that speaks to us about life now?   A Museum of Now, as well as a Museum of Then.

I was particularly impressed by the spirit of creativity maintained throughout the adversity of the Maidan revolution…how people managed to subvert state power and the armed police by making small acts of individual protest that were a creative response to the dominant narrative of showing strength through combat: the piano-playing men and women on the frontline, whose fingers kept playing in temperatures below minus 20; the painted helmets bringing the tradition of ‘petrykivka’ to the protesters’ orange hardhats; the women holding mirrors up to the ranks of policemen, inviting them to look closely at who they were.

Window for blogI propose that the Museum of Maidan is not a place but a series of Acts of Creative Protest that celebrate the collective spirit of Maidan. Rather than a building, full of objects, could there be an annual call out for ideas which results in actions? Ideas shortlisted and winners agreed by a committee of experts who allocate resources to each year’s Maidan Museum of Now?  These small gestures of protest would honour the past by staying relevant to the present, responding to the specifics of new times and new places.

Tributes of candles and flowers brought daily

Tributes of candles and flowers brought daily

Another idea would be to make the Museum an event which involves both a temporary display of objects in public, and a shared civic curatorial responsibility.  People would be invited to bring an object of their choice – something which symbolises the spirit of Maidan to them – which would be displayed in Maidan Nezhalezhnosti for one day only. It might be something they made, or a photo, or a newspaper cutting. On that day, others might contribute by doing something in public like singing a song, reading out a poem, playing a tune for those that attend.

The final action would involve people leaving the square,  each person taking a single object away with them and looking after it at home until the following year… when the Museum opens again, for one day only.  The Museum is then both public, for a very short time, and also private, back in your home, with one object in your care…so the people are the curators, and the custodians of the Museum,and the event serves to remind us that we are responsible for looking after our society as carefully as we do our own homes and family.

Rushnyk on display inside a traditional cottage

Rushnyk on display inside a traditional cottage

Just as the work to create a better society in Ukraine carries on, and isn’t over just because a corrupt President has gone and there’s a new Parliament, so the struggle to create a better world continues beyond this country’s borders as well as inside. I would like any Museum of Maidan to connect with people engaged in peaceful struggle elsewhere: in Thailand or Turkey, Venezuela and Egypt. So could the Museum be something very small that contains fire or light which moves around the world –  kept alight by the care of those who are in the frontline, as a way of reminding us all that we do better if we think about others before ourselves?”

(This text was published in Kraina magazine, 20/04/14; a current affairs magazine published weekly in Ukraine)

 

the Sauna Train of Ukraine, to Chernivtsi

With Anatolii and Katya - they might look cool but actually we were HOT

With Anatolii and Katya – they might look cool but actually we were melting HOT

So it’s 20 degrees outside, and 30 degrees inside, with no possibility of opening any windows. 4 bunks in our cabin, and the train rattles through the night on its 13 hour journey to Chernivtsi in western Ukraine.

Chai, served by each carriage’s conductor in glass mugs with decorative silver holders and matching teaspoons, provides welcome refreshment as we gently sweat.

I was invited to Katya’s home town to speak at the University where her father, Dr Vasyl Byalyuk, is Chair of the Dept of Translation.

pic of university building

Chernivtsi University – A UNESCO World Heritage site, built in 1860.

Sixty students of English (philology and translation) and teaching staff turned up to listen to my presentation about the value of culture, sharing the experience of how the arts have been a driver for regeneration and entrepreneurial activity in the UK’s North West.I talked too about stories – how my story and your story become, collectively, what represents us…our culture: a national identity woven from the warp and weft of individual and civic stories.

The evening before, the British Council had hosted a soirée designed to hear from some of the key players in Ukraine’s cultural scene about what they perceive to be the challenges facing them, and what they need from the British Council at this point in the country’s development.

pic of 12 people

Ukraine’s cultural leaders meet British Council’s team in Ukraine

“We need to make and show film, theatre, and art which promotes tolerance” said one. “We need you to support the education of our young film makers, choreographers, theatre makers by offering fast track ways in which curators and producers can learn skills which enable them to support our own artists from all disciplines” said another. “The British Council’s role in encouraging work which promotes diversity, and supporting artists to find ways to bring diverse communities together is crucial – given the increasing schism between eastern and western Ukraine” observed a third.

In a guidebook for Chernivtsi I read “From the City Hall balcony, magistrate employees once spoke to citizens in 3 languages (Ukrainian, Russian, Romanian) informing them about events in the world and the city. The capital of Bukovyna (the region of Ukraine which touches Romania and Moldova) was always distinguished by tolerance and a variety of cultures“.

That rich history is everywhere: Armenian Street, the House of Romanians, Turkish Square, the synagogues around the corner from Orthodox churches, the German Haus, the classicism of the architecture of the Austro-Hungarian empire next to modernist 1930’s civic buildings. The history of Bukovyna is one (another one) of occupation, assimilation…and tolerance. Today the pedestrianised Main St is full of prams and children, balloon sellers and girls in high heels, and in the nearby markets old women sell their pickles while old men sit smoking.

Deliciously random objects to sit side by side, in the Museum

Deliciously random objects to sit side by side, in the Museum

In the museum of the History and Ethnography of the Chernivtsi Region, rooms of objects are laid out in a wonderfully haphazard way – the taxidermist’s handiwork juxtaposed with traditional costume, next to a room of WW1 memorabilia, alongside some fascinating photos and masks from the Malanka carnival tradition still maintained in Bukovyna’s villages.

One of the students asked me about whether we in the UK are envious of the purity of some of Ukraine’s folk traditions…in our mixed up, mash up cultural melting pot, have we lost respect for “purity”?

I don’t think ‘pure’ traditions really exist – the folkloric aspects of western Ukrainian culture come to us from the weaving together of different influences. And culture that stagnates becomes irrelevant and we no longer care enough to fight for its survival.

The challenge facing Ukraine’s new cultural ministry remains – how much of its tiny resources are needed to preserve the past and how much should be spent on supporting artists to create new work, new films, new shows that speak to, and of, today’s fractured society? Art which might help people understand the immense shift that has taken place in Ukraine in the last 4 months.

A round table discussion with teaching staff, and a shameless promotional opportunity!

A round table discussion with teaching staff

The British Council in Ukraine is listening carefully to those who have proved their credibility in the artistic life of Ukraine by making things happen against all odds. It needs to be bold in its own approach, and in its encouragement and support of Ukraine’s artists, curators, producers, teachers and translators to be ambitious, despite the constant challenge of finding resources; and above all, it needs to continue to promote tolerance as a fundamental value.

 

Podillya to Crimea

pic of lake and grotto

Sofiyivska Park in Uman, named after Sofia, a young Greek woman reputedly so beautiful she inspired her husband to build her this park in central Ukraine.

International Women’s Day is a significant celebration here – I’ve never seen so many people on the metro with flowers, we all got a day off work, and I made a trip to Uman (which happens to rhyme with Woman) by bus with an English teacher friend, Anastasiia.

Our destination was Sofiyivskii Park, created by a Polish aristocrat for his wife, Sofia, on her birthday in 1802. As a child, Sofia had been sold to a Polish Ambassador by her widowed mother; and was bought and sold throughout her life before she married Count Potocki.  She ended up having a tempestuous love affair with the Count’s stepson, which drove the Count to leave Uman, never to return. You can’t buy love, or at least you can’t buy everlasting love, even if you can make an everlastingly lovely park.

pic of lake

The Park was designed by architect Ludwig Metzel “to outshine any other park in Europe”, and it is indeed beautiful. We explored the gardens, grottoes and lakes; saw a red squirrel, warrior beatles, and a woodpecker; and found a man selling handmade wooden trinkets.

An impromptu celebration with rum
An impromptu celebration with rum!

His friends invited us to share rum and chocolate in the sunshine: so we drank 3 toasts – to Women in acknowledgement of International Women’s Day, to Ukraine, and to Love. You could almost hear the Polish Count turning in his grave!

060And from there to Vinnitsa – where we were greeted by a strangely lonely wedding dress on display in the bus station; and a day spent visiting the Museum of Nikolai Pirogov, an eminent surgeon whose home and pharmacy are now open to visitors.

Pirogov's MausoleumBut before the Museum, the Mausoleum – when he died aged 88, his wife had him embalmed, and we were taken into the cold marbled depths of this chapel to view the doctor’s body, now 130 years older, on display in a glass-topped coffin, surrounded by bouquets of plastic flowers.

Fishing in Vinnitsa

Fishing in Vinnitsa

Inside Pirogov’s home, we saw displayed the tools of this surgeon who had tried to mend the men wounded & shattered in the Crimean Wars of the mid nineteenth century. Outside the doctor’s estate today, men fished in the sunshine. I saw the first snowdrops, and my second red squirrel of the weekend; and all seemed peaceful.

But in Crimea now, in 2014, the Russian army is tightening its grip and the schism between Russia and Ukraine is widening.

I was actually supposed to be visiting Sevastopol in Crimea at the weekend, but the trip was called off because of the unstable and worsening position there. The referendum that’s been called for March 16 by the Crimean regional council is illegal, and the self-appointed leader of Crimea has no mandate to represent anyone. People who define themselves as Russian in Crimea number about 56%, (Ukrainians and Crimean Tartars make up about 34% of the region’s population) and it’s unlikely that even all of them want to become part of Russia…but the outcome of this week’s referendum will be rigged.

pic of waxworks

Waxworks of Dr Pirogov at work in his pharmacy

Most of the Crimean Tartars were deported by Stalin, but some have returned since the region became part of Ukraine. But since the arrival of Russian troops, many fear attack.

So do we face the prospect of another Crimean War? At least one colleague at the British Council thinks so and has left his job to respond to the call up by the Ukraine Army who are now training new conscripts for battle.

“Along the whole line of the Sevastopol bastions, which for so many months now had been seething with an unusually active life, had seen heroes released one by one into the arms of death, and had aroused the fear, hatred and latterly the admiration of the enemy forces, there was now not a soul to be seen. The whole place was laid waste, uncanny – but not quiet: the destruction was still continuing…….

Surging together and ebbing apart like the waves of the sea on this gloomy swell-rocked night, uneasily shuddering with all its massive volume, swaying out along the bridge and over on the North side by the bay, the Sevastopol force moved slowly in a dense, impenetrable crush away from the place where it had left behind so many brave men, the place that was entirely saturated in its blood; the place which for eleven months it had held against an enemy twice as powerful, and which it had now been instructed to abandon without a struggle.”

Leo Tolstoy, Sevastopol in August 1855

Chornobyl – lest we forget

photo of reactor number 4

the reactor encased in a concrete tomb, 28 years old and deteriorating

In April 1986 I was living in Finland and I remember the panic amongst the Finnish and Swedish authorities when massive levels of radiation started being picked up in the atmosphere… we were advised to stay indoors. The radioactivity wasn’t coming from within Scandinavia, but from the USSR. Visiting Chornobyl, just 80k north of Kyiv, 28 years later felt like a pilgrimage that I had to make, and I’m so glad I did.

the diving boards at the swimming pool in the Palace of Culture

the diving boards at the swimming pool in the Palace of Culture in Pripyat.

On the tour bus, we were shown a film that set the context – the model Soviet new town of Pripyat, built in 1970, and home to 47,000 citizens; the much older settlement of Chornobyl, surrounded by fertile land and forest known for its abundance of mushrooms; and Ukraine’s largest nuclear reactor. We drove through the outer exclusion zone, now home to 3000 workers, and were taken much closer to Reactor Number 4 than I’d imagined we’d go – here we witnessed the teams at work building the new sarcophogus which will roll into place, covering the disintegrating tomb that currently encases the still radioactive core.

pic of memorial

memorial to the 31 firefighters who died in the initial fire…many thousands more were to die later

The external decontamination operation has been massive and mainly successful – but the death toll was significantly higher than the 31 official deaths of the firefighters. Soldiers, who named themselves bio-robots, ended up doing the most hazardous work when the hastily fabricated clean-up machines failed due to irradiation; helicopter pilots, scientists, and other “liquidators” fighting to control the fate of the reactor, were the main victims at the time. Subsequently, 125,000 deaths have been directly attributed to the accident, and the incidence of thyroid cancer in children from the region numbers around 1 in 10.

Entertainment facilities in Pripyat included a ferris wheel and dodgem cars...

Entertainment facilities in Pripyat included a ferris wheel and dodgem cars…

In Pripyat, we walked around a ghost town that is being inexorably reclaimed by nature. From the lines of cots in the kindergarten to the empty diving boards of the swimming pool, from the supermarket with its signs for sugar, bread, and tea to the billboards in the Palace of Culture lying ready for the 1986 May Day celebrations, everything is pretty much as it was when the town was evacuated….too late to prevent contamination, finally the entire population was removed in 3 hours, on the understanding that they would return within 3 days. The scale of the Soviet authorities denial/cover up was described as criminal by our young guide, but there was also great heroism shown by the men involved in the clean up. Chornobyl remains the world’s worst nuclear disaster and many people are still living with its consequences.

the secondary school, eerily silent, and the playground a hot spot for radiation

the secondary school, eerily silent, its playground still a hot spot for radiation

In the UK, we are considering more investment in nuclear as a clean alternative – clean until something goes wrong, at which point the consequences of playing with nuclear fission are so extraordinarily massive as to convince me that this will be the way humans destroy themselves and the planet. Visiting Chornobyl now is a poignant and unsettling experience which I would recommend to anyone interested in the alternative energy debate.

through the school window, emptiness

through the school window, nature gradually reclaims its territory

#EuroMaidan, the fight for Independence

I returned to Ukraine this week, and the mood at the British Council – and out on the streets – has changed a lot since I was here before Christmas. “We’ve realised that our country has been hijacked by criminals – the men at the top are criminals hanging onto their power” said one friend.

Winter afternoon view from the British Council office window

Winter afternoon view from the British Council office window

The international press focus has been on the skirmishes between police and protestors around the stadium, and the black smoke of tyres burning hung for a time in the air. Protesters have been shot (and 5 killed) with live ammunition, or stripped naked in the street, and the challenge of maintaining a non-violent protest in the face of such provocation is overwhelming. And of course, there are radical elements on the fringes of the Euromaidan movement. But that’s only a small part of the story…the bigger part is the ongoing struggle to put in place, in opposition, a sustainable framework for democratic action, an independent judiciary and a fairer state.

In the wake of the collapse of the Soviet Union, Ukraine did not have to fight for its independence. But one corrupt government after another has mismanaged the country in order to line their own pockets, and what is happening here now is that ordinary people all over Ukraine are fighting back against corruption (and Kremlin interference), making a stand… creatively, with great dignity, and with amazing resourcefulness. That’s what the press should be showing more, and what the world should be applauding.

The legislation that was illegally rushed through parliament by the President will have fundamental effects on Ukraine’s connections with the rest of the world, if it isn’t rescinded – as well as making the protesters into criminals or “extremists”, the work of “foreign agents”, NGO’s and perhaps organisations like the British Council will be curtailed.

Those of you who work in the Arts and Culture in the UK could think about what you or your organisation can do to assist (finding and funding professional development opportunities for young producers or curators, for example, or fostering links with Ukrainian artists) …and everyone should applaud the hundreds of thousands of people who are standing in Maidan Nezelezhnosti (Independence Square…hence the name #Maidan attached to this whole movement), or on the streets in other parts of Ukraine, in temperatures of minus 20, doing what they can to make Ukraine’s future one that is built on equality of opportunity, justice, and respect.

 

 

Error 404 – Democracy not found

pic of sign

Sign (held up  for at least 2 hours) as part of Sunday’s street demonstrations

I was going to write about the Drama UA festival in Lviv and the role of the theatre critic, but events in Ukraine have rather overtaken me. So I’ll begin with the demonstrations: a theatre of democracy? Ten days ago, protests started in many cities when Ukraine’s President made it clear that the Association Agreement with the EU wasn’t going to be signed. 100,000 people marched in the streets of the capital on Sunday 24 Nov, and protests have been maintained in the main squares – EuroMaidan and Maidan Nezelezhnosti (Independence Square) – ever since, with appeals for non-violent direct action from opposition parties and assorted political groups. Do watch this video:

video from euromaidan protest, thanks to Biggggidea.com

The violent break up of the peaceful sit-in protest on Saturday (30th Nov) with people forcibly removed by police, and a number of casualties, led to the government making it illegal to gather in the squares. And that was the touch paper for people to come out last Sunday (Dec 1st)  in their hundreds of thousands.

Crowds gather in the park

Jan Bradley & Liz Pugh stand with the people of Ukraine, in their hundreds of thousands

Jan & Liz stand in support of the people of Ukraine, who came out on the streets in their hundreds of thousands.

My friend Jan was visiting for the weekend and we had walked to Maidan on Friday to see for ourselves what was happening. When we set out for the day on Sunday, we knew there was going to be a demonstration, and when the first 2 underground trains that came by were so packed there was absolutely no way we could get on, we realised that it was going to be big. I’ve never seen such crowds – and I’ve seen Man Utd’s Old Trafford ground which holds 78,000 emptying as I live nearby. In the course of 2 hours, I’d say at least 6 football matches of people flowed past us – with singing, chanting and flags.  And people of all ages were there…children, young people, adults and senior citizens. Below is a scene from within the City Hall, occupied by the protestors  – for more photos from this journalist check  photographs of Ukraine’s protests

Behind this willingness to stand up and be counted is a desperate desire to be part of a democratic country that is not controlled behind the scenes by Russia/Putin, or riven by corruption. Europe represents both different values, and (relative) economic prosperity – and the free market and mass consumerism as we have it in Western Europe holds huge appeal here: Ukraine – be careful what you wish for.

And the crowds flowed past, on and on and on

And the crowds flowed past, on and on and on

Ukraine needs investment and its chances of attracting foreign investment are higher if it’s seen to be on a path to combating corruption. It needs to strengthen its regional development, as the gap between the capital city and the rest of the country is huge; it needs to grow its technical, agricultural and creative capacity; and hold onto its talent – at the moment too many of the bright, educated young people that I speak to at the British Council want to leave rather than stay to play an active part of their country’s future.

There’s little independent media here, so the role of social media, the Kyiv Post (written in English) and other internet reporting, along with foreign press like the Guardian with correspondents on the ground here, has been crucial. I’m sure you’ve all been following the reports on BBC, and for anyone on Twitter #euromaidan or #Kyiv or #Ukraine have been the hashtags du jour. Do read this on the use of social media if you’re interested.

Vyshyvanky - traditional embroidered shirts - on sale in Lviv's market

Vyshyvanky – traditional embroidered shirts – on sale in Lviv’s market

Drama UA Festival.    I met some energetic and exciting theatre makers, artists and dramaturgs at the Drama UA Festival in Lviv, which offers a workshop programme and debate alongside new performances.

Drama UA posters

Drama UA Festival invites theatremakers to Lviv

The East European Performing Arts Platform were meeting there, which ensured representatives from Hungary, Poland, the Czech Republic, Slovenia, Slovakia and Romania could join colleagues from Ukraine in discussing how to ensure theatre remains urgent, vital, relevant, and valued.

It was especially interesting for me to hear the voice of central and eastern European cultural commentators; and to listen to debate around the crisis in theatre criticism, which has been part of the formal academic training in theatre here, and which is still taught in 3 universities… the decline of the written word in print, the rejection of the ‘expert’ voice in favour of immediate personal comment on social media, and saturation levels of entertainment where articles around celebrity lifestyle have replaced the academically informed theorist’s commentary, described interestingly as “acting as a controller” to maintain “the purity of theatre”. This made me realise that in the UK little remains of the tradition of theatre criticism a la Kenneth Tynan, and less and less space is given to reviews in papers. Now there is far more written about cultural policy than about the art itself. Perhaps the traditional theatre critic has been replaced in the UK by those who write about the value of theatre …not its cost, nor even its meaning, but its value to us, the audience or the consumer? So I asked a UK writer, Richard Hector Jones, to comment:

“The modern critic needs to grasp socio-political context: they write about not what the art means, but what it means to us. The critic needs to use the art to discuss the now.  Given that anyone can technically be a critic, insight becomes the commodity, not opinion…or someone pontificating on whether something is stamped ‘good’ or ”bad’.  Richard HJ, Creative Concern, Manchester, UK.

Theatre Director Jan Willem van den Bosch in "The Most Expensive Galician Restaurant"

Theatre Director Jan Willem van den Bosch led a Master Class, part of the British Council’s Behind the Scenes

UK theatre director Jan Willem van den Bosch’s Master Class was supported by the British Council, as part of its Behind the Scenes intitiative; and after a discussion between us over dinner in one of Lviv’s amazing restaurants – we had to knock on a door at the top of some rickety stairs and convince an old man to let us into candlelit rooms where piano & violin were playing; and the exorbitant prices on the bill were not the price you paid, you had to haggle– Jan invited me to talk to his group the next day.

So I ended up speaking about the role of the Producer, and the need for creativity to extend beyond the rehearsal space and into all aspects of making work, which prompted an interesting discussion with the drama students & professional theatre directors/choreographers/artists in his group.

Master Class at DramaUA Festival

Ukraine’s independent theatre professionals discuss contemporary performance

Being in another country reminds me of the importance of being clear in the vocabulary we use when talking about the Arts.

Eastern European Performing Arts Platform  members meet Lviv City Council Culture team

EEPAP members meet Lviv City Council’s Culture team at City Hall

When we work in another language – and most people at the Eastern European Platform meeting had to use English as their common language, though there were no native speakers – we have to check the assumptions behind the jargon.

And I think this checking of exactly what we mean is good practice for all of us – an understanding of the role of a Producer, for example, can vary hugely from person to person. I noticed that many people referred to the dramaturg as having responsibilities beyond that of a bridge between writer and director and audience in terms of work with text. In eastern Europe, so I’m told, the dramaturg might also come up with the idea/concept behind the performance, raise the money and find the partners, and then work with the team throughout…something which I would see as the work of a Producer.  It’s worth checking our mutual understanding of the vocabulary when we begin to use arts jargon, as well as when we collaborate across borders, across languages, and across other potential cultural divides.

At the Family Boim Chapel, built in 1609

At the Family Boim Chapel, built in 1609, for a Hungarian merchant in Lviv